The Great Shakeout or The Great Shakedown?

As California hospitals scramble to meet state deadlines for seismic compliance, a bigger problem is looming: can they afford it?  In the wake of the 1994 Northridge earthquake that struck the San Fernando Valley, causing structural damage to eleven hospitals, California lawmakers looked for ways to improve seismic resilience across the state. One of the

Food Stamp Distribution Among CA Counties

At 6.7 million, the number of food-insecure Californians in 2019 tops the population of 86 different countries. A person is defined as food insecure if they lack consistent access to enough food for an active and healthy lifestyle. Almost all California counties have food insecurity rates between 10 and 18 percent. The problem is not

Upzoning the Inland Empire

While most of the discussion surrounding the controversial MORE Homes Act (SB50) has focused on the impact on communities in the Bay Area and greater Los Angeles, the bill could have a tangible impact on neighborhoods in the Inland Empire as well.  In response to the ever-present California housing crisis, Sen. Scott Wiener (D-San Francisco)

California High School CTE Funding

California has become a national leader in providing grants for school districts to improve their CTE programs. But how well have Southern California districts done in capitalizing on available funds and how are districts implementing these funds? In a previous post, the Lowe Down analyzed the Inland Empire’s capacity to prepare workers for the region’s

Is the Parking Meter Price Right?

While policy makers search for a way to cut down traffic in one of the most congested cities in the world, Los Angeles drivers wait. An earlier blog post of the Lowe Down, Is the Commuting Price Right?, explored the per-mile tax idea that policy makers have to cut down on congestion. While this idea

Olympic Infrastructure as Keynesian Stimulus

Since the first international Olympic Games in 1896, the Olympics has served as an opportunity for host cities to boost their economies. Employment surges are largely attributed to sudden increases in jobs needed for preparations, staffing, and construction. As Los Angeles looks to the 2028 Olympics, The Lowe Institute has used data from past Olympics